Shrimp Marinara

Serves 4
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Ingredients:
1 jar of 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce
1 ½  lb of 12/16 shrimp ( On the chart it would be either a jumbo shrimp or colossal) 5 shrimp per person
¼ cup of extra virgin olive oil
3 cloves of garlic peeled and sliced
¼ cup of sherry wine
¼ tsp of salt (optional)
Pinch of red pepper flakes
1 tablespoon of chopped parsley

Procedure:

1. Peel and devein the shrimp washing them in cold water. You can leave the tails on for extra flavor when sautéing.  Remember how I said that the shrimp peels are very flavorful.

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2. Add extra virgin olive oil, garlic, red pepper flakes, thinly sliced garlic and shrimp to a skillet.

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3. Over medium heat cooks until the shrimp turn opaque to white.  Probably takes about 5 minutes.  Immediately turn off heat and deglaze with sherry wine and put in parsley.

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4. Add jar of 24-ounce 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce. Heat over medium heat until sauce starts to bubble. It cooks quick.  Don’t overcook or the shrimp will become rubbery.

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5. Ready to serve.  You may serve it over pasta of your choice.

Buon Natale e Buon Appetito!

Nonna’s Neapolitan Meatballs

Ingredients:
4 slices bread (2 packed cups’ worth)
2 pounds ground beef or you can use a mix of pork, veal. and beef
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
1/4 cup grated Parmagiano Reggiano
1/4 cup golden raisins (optional)
1/4 cup toasted pine nuts (optional)
1 1/2 teaspoons fine sea salt
15 turns white pepper
4 large eggs
1/2 cup dried bread crumbs
825 MAIN Marinara Sauce

Preparation:
1. Heat the oven to 325°F. Put the fresh bread in a bowl, cover it with water, and let it soak for a minute or so. Pour off the water and wring out the bread, then crumble and tear it into tiny pieces.
2. Combine the bread with all the remaining ingredients except the tomato sauce in a medium mixing bowl, adding them in the order they are listed. Add the dried bread crumbs last to adjust for wetness: the mixture should be moist wet, not sloppy wet.

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3. Using a small scoop, scoop and level dropping the meatball evenly on a baking sheet. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes. The meatballs will be firm but still juicy and gently yielding when they’re cooked through. (At this point, you can cool the meatballs and hold them in the refrigerator for as long as a couple of days or freeze them for the future.
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4. Meanwhile, heat the 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce in a sauté pan large enough to accommodate the meatballs comfortably.

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5. Place the meatballs into the pan of sauce and nudge the heat up ever so slightly. Simmer the meatballs for half an hour or so (this isn’t one of those cases where longer is better) so they can soak up some sauce. Keep them there until it’s time to eat.

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See our recipes for
Gluten-Free Meatballs
Vegetarian: Ricotta & Zucchini Balls
Vegan Eggplant Balls

Gluten-Free Meatballs

Ingredients:
1 ½ pounds of meatloaf mix (veal, pork, and beef chopped meat)
3 eggs
¼ cup of chopped fresh parsley
¼ cup of grated Parmigiana Reggiano cheese
1 clove of garlic grated on the microplane or minced
½ cup of almond meal
Salt and pepper to taste
1 jar of 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce

Procedure:

  1. In a bowl mix all the ingredients. Don’t over mix.
  2. Using a small scoop. Scoop and level and place on a baking sheet fitted with parchment paper.
  3. Bake at 350 degrees for 15-20 minutes depending on the size of the meatballs. Small scoop makes about 40 meatballs.
  4. Meanwhile, heat the 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce in a sauté pan large enough to accommodate the meatballs comfortably.

Grilled Pesto Shrimp Recipe

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Ingredients:
Shrimp (size at your discretion), peeled (tails left on) and deveined
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 cup basil leaves (There are numerous varieties of this spicy, aromatic herb, but sweet basil and bush basil are the most common. It is used mostly in dishes that contain tomatoes, and in salads, soups and on pizzas. Freshly chopped basil should be used whenever possible, as dried basil makes a poor substitute)
3 large garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes (These devilishly hot flakes are used in traditional dishes like spaghetti aglio, olio e peperoncino and are found on almost every Italian table alongside the salt and pepper.)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup grated Parmigiano Reggiano
1/4 cup pignoli or walnuts
825 MAIN Marinara Sauce for dipping

Procedures:

  1. In a food processor or blender, combine the olive oil, basil, garlic, red pepper flakes, salt, Parmigiano-Reggiano and pignoli/walnuts. Process until the mixture is well blended. Reserve two tablespoons of the pesto in a bowl large enough to hold all of the shrimp and set aside. Pour the remaining pesto over the shrimp and let sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes to marinate.
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  2. If a grill is available all the better. If not just use a cast iron pan and cook shrimp until firm to the touch but do not overcook or they will be rubbery!
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Chicken Manicotti

Ingredients:
2 cups chicken, cooked and diced
2 eggs, beaten
1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese, divided
1 cup grated Parmagiana cheese, divided
One 15-ounce container ricotta cheese
1/4 cup fresh basil, chiffonade
1 large clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon salt, divided
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons flour
2 cups half and half
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
One jar of 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce
12 manicotti, cooked and rinsed in cold water

Directions:

  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  • In a medium size bowl combine the ricotta, 1/2 of the cup parmagiana cheese, eggs, and mozzarella. Stir in the basil, garlic, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt, 1/4 teaspoon of the pepper, and chicken until well combined. Set the filling aside.
  • In a saucepan, melt the butter and whisk in the flour, and the rest of the salt. Cook for a few minutes, stirring constantly just until the mixture starts to brown. Whisk in the half and half, stirring until becomes thick. Remove from heat and stir in the rest of the parmagiana cheese and nutmeg. Pour into large casserole dish, spreading around to completely to coat the bottom.
  • Place the filling into a large zip lock bag. Clip one corner and fill the manicotti from both sides and place over the white sauce. Repeat with the remaining manicotti and the filling. Pour the 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce over manicotti evenly. Sprinkle with the remaining 1/2 cup of mozzarella (or more if you like). Bake for about 25 minutes or until the filling is heated through.

Penne al’ Amalfitano Recipe

Layer a bowl of penne with 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce, a spoon of pesto* and topped with a spoon of ricotta cheese drizzled with extra virgin olive oil.

Pesto

Ingredients:
1 cup of chopped fresh Italian Parsley
1 ½ cup chopped fresh Basil
½ cup of grated parmagiana cheese
½ cup extra virgin olive oil
¼ cup of toasted pignoli nuts or toasted walnuts
1 large clove of garlic
¼ tsp salt
½ boiled potato (mashed) yellow potato is the creamiest choice of potato

Procedure:
Blend all together in food processor/ blender.

Bucatini All’Amatriciana

Bucatini all”Amatricianais an ode to simplicity – rich smoked pork, sweet tomatoes, heat from chili peppers, and the sharp, salty kick of pecorino cheese. Because amatriciana is a classic dish it has a long history and because it is Italian, this history is controversial and hotly disputed. Most but not all agree that “amatriciana” comes from Amatrice, a tiny town in the mountains bordering Abruzzo about 100 miles from Rome. (Some Romans claim that the dish is truly alla matriciana, developed by Romans and that Amatrice has nothing to do with such culinary bliss). Most agree that the dish descends from gricia, a pasta dish made with pepper, cheese, and smoked pork jowl, also known as guanciale.

Bucatini all’amatriciana has a different flavor profile than most Italian pasta. In its purest, most classic form the sauce has only four ingredients: cured pork, tomatoes, cheese, and hot peppers. Because of the recipe’s poor origins (this was the dish of shepherds, not statesmen), there is traditionally no onion, no garlic, no herbs. Because of this it tastes wildly different from the familiar Italian-American tomato sauce served with spaghetti and meatballs. The modern Roman version often adds onions, garlic, or a splash of dry white wine.

Serves 4

Ingredients:
¾ pound guanciale, or pancetta, thinly sliced **
3 garlic cloves
1 red onion, halved and sliced ½-inch thick
1 ½ teaspoons hot red pepper flakes
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 ½ cups 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce
1 pound  bucatini *
1 bunch of flat-leaf parsley, leaves only
Pecorino Romano, for grating

Instructions:

  1. Being 6 quarts of water to a boil and add 2 tablespoons of salt.
  2. Place the guanciale slices in a 12- to 14-inch sauté pan in a single layer and cook over medium-low heat until most of the fat has been rendered from the meat, turning occasionally. Remove the meat to a plate lined with paper towels and discard half the fat, leaving enough to coat the garlic, onion and red pepper flakes. Return the guanciale to the pan with the vegetables, and cook over medium-high heat for 5 minutes, or until the onions, garlic and guanciale are light golden brown. Season with salt and pepper, add the tomato sauce, reduce the heat, and simmer for 10 minutes.
  3. Cook the bucatini in the boiling water according to the package directions, until al dente. Drain the pasta and add it to the simmering sauce. Add the parsley leaves, increase the heat to high and toss to coat. Divide the pasta among four warmed pasta bowls. Top with freshly grated Pecorino cheese and serve immediately.

 

*What is Bucatini pasta?
Bucatini pasta is a long, hollow Italian pasta. While at first glance it might look like thick spaghetti, bucatini pasta is a very unique noodle, and it plays an important role in the cuisine of some Italian regions. Pasta specialty stores may carry it, and it is also possible to find bucatini pasta in some grocery stores, especially in areas with a large Italian population.  The name for the pasta is derived from the Italian buco, which means “hole,” a reference to the hollow shape of bucatini pasta. It is believed that the pasta originated in central Italy. It is closely related to maccheroncelli, another long, tubular pasta. Bucatini pasta may also be found labeled as perciatelli. I grew up calling them perciatelli  and it wasn’t until I looked for them in a specialty food store that I found that they are called bucatini . All of these pastas are slightly different, but closely related enough that they can frequently be substituted for each other. Because the pasta is dense and strong, bucatini pairs well with robust, hearty sauces, especially those which contain meat. One of the classic dishes containing bucatini pasta, Bucatini all’Amatriciana, is made with bucatini and a hearty tomato sauce with large chunks of pancetta or bacon. This sauce pairs very well with the pasta, which is ideally suited to holding up heavy sauces.

**What is Guanciale?
What really makes this dish is the guanciale. It’s all about the ingredients, and with a little effort, you can find them here in the US.   Guanciale is cured pork jowl. You cannot substitute it, and it can’t be smoked—only cured. Some people, not Romans, use pancetta as a substitute, but the guanciale is sweeter, fatter, and has a more delicate and less salty taste than pancetta (cured pork belly). It melts as you heat it in the pan, and the rendered fat transports the jowl’s unique flavor throughout the dish. Touching each piece of pasta and spoonful of sauce with it’s sweet and salty magic. Substituting it, changes the dish altogether, and should be considered a mortal sin.  If you are substituting bacon or salt pork, you want the streakiest (i.e. fattiest) cut you can find.  If guanciale is unavailable, pancetta is a fine substitute. However as you guanciale has a significantly higher fat content than pancetta. If neither guanciale nor pancetta is available in your neighborhood, you can always use a top-quality lean bacon. One can blanch bacon for one minute in boiling water to remove some of its smoky flavor. If substituting either pancetta or bacon, I would recommend adding an extra tablespoon of olive oil before sauteeing the onion to compensate for the lower fat content.

Zuppe di Clams Marinara

Fresh parsleyIngredients:
24 littleneck clams
1 clove chopped garlic
1 Tbl fresh chopped parsley
One 25 oz jar 825 MAIN Marinara Sauce
1 lb linguine

Procedure:
Wash clams and scrub under cold running water with stiff brush. Discard any opened clams. Combine olive oil in saucepan heat. Add clams, still in their shells. Add chop garlic and parsley. Cover and cook 2 min. Add Marinara Sauce and cook 10 min. Bring 2 quarts of water in pot to a boil add, 1/2 teaspoon salt and begin cooking pasta for 7 minutes. Drain pasta and plate. Pour the clam sauce over the pasta and serve.

Prep time:10 minutes
Cooking time: 15 minutes
Serves 4